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Archive for March, 2009

After a few months of hanging out with boys who tag walls when they drink, I’ve found myself restless. I don’t have the artistic or delinquent tendencies to vandalise public spaces so  I end up skulking in the shadows while they bomb. My left-brain sees all the ‘creative’ spelling and grammar  of lesser artists and I joke about keeping myself busy with a crimson paint pen, circling, correcting and grading their bathroom-wall scrawls.

The London College of Communications must be feeling the same way. Their guerilla marketing campaign is an apt, funny and visually arresting way to encourage artists off the streets and into design school.

Source: Nice Fucking Graphics

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Shunsuke Umiyama’s Vine mobile phone charger

Shunsuke Umiyama’s Vine mobile phone charger

Shunsuke Umiyama’s Vine mobile phone charger

Shunsuke Umiyama’s Vine mobile phone charger

Oooms Twig USB drive

Oooms’ Twig USB drive

Oooms’ Twig USB drive

Oooms’ Twig USB drive

Shunsuke Umiyama’s conceptual mobile phone charger for KDDI and Oooms’ USB drive… a little cutesy but I’m happy to see new takes on a tangle of cords and rectangular flash drives that feel like a pack of Juicy Fruit at the bottom of a bag.

Source: Oooms, Spoon & Tamago

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Sam Songailo

Sam Songailo for Iain Dawson exhibition

Panamanian tapir mola

Panamanian tapir mola

I’ve been especially hyped on South American art, textiles and illustration lately. Sam Songailo‘s paintings remind me of Panamanian molas, unfinished fabric panels embroidered with a reverse appliqué technique. A reverse appliqué involves several layers of fabric quilted together, the top layer being cut to reveal coloured fabrics underneath (a sort of textile equivalent to the tempera paint and wax crayon projects we did in elementary school).

Songailo approaches his abstract paintings from a similar mindset with an “intricate layering of visual systems, systems that draw you in with a particular intensity of colour, an obsession with surface, texture and colour.”

Source: Booooooooom, TPF

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To Go

Dalvey pocket flask and telescopic cup

Dalvey pocket flask and telescopic cup

Dalvey telescopic cup

Dalvey telescopic cup

Orikaso cup

Orikaso cup

I’ve been a staunch supporter of reusable coffee cups for years and have a shocking collection of travel mugs ranging from functional stainless steel 20oz to purely attractive transparent Perspex 8oz. As much as I love them, the dimensions are simply too cumbersome to carry on a regular basis, and I have used too many paper cups for lack of a tumbler tucked in my carryalls.

It’s about time for the telescopic styling of vessels made for hikers and campers to be brought into the forefront of the nomadic urban landscape. Dalvey does a beautiful job with their stainless steel collection, although a functional matching lid could swiftly move their products beyond a gentlemen’s demographic. Orikaso‘s folding cups are a sweet option for casual use and the polypropylene structure has a load of potential, as does the design of these telescopic glasses.

I anticipate some young industrial design student doing great things with this concept in the coming semesters and successfully marketing it to this generation’s yuppies, international airport transients and modern kitchen boutique afficionados.

Source: Dalvey Depot, Modern Outpost, Myriad, Saddler, TFTS

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